Dining Lebanese in KLCC @ Al-Amar, Pavilion KLCC, Kuala Lumpur

Date of Visit: Numerous times since 2011, the latest visit being November 2012

Tabouli is basically a salad of bulgur, parsley, tomatoes, mint, green onions, olive oil and lemon juice. Simple as it is, I love tabouli very much. I love the zingy sharp acidity of lemons mixed with the robust flavours of mint, parsleys and shallots. When I first arrived KL, I often went to Al-Amar for my tabouli fix. Although their tabouli is overly masticated to a pulp, I still went there for their Tabasco-ey tabouli which included the hot red chili padi that suited the Malaysian tastebuds.

Yes, I know tabouli is easy to make at home, but getting my hands on the fresh herbs was a chore for a new arrival especially since the supermarket downstairs does not have a complete stock of fresh herbs and I don’t know where the market is.  Anyway, how convenient was it to have one of Malaysia’s Best Restaurant at your doorsteps right?

Anyway, here is the review of my last visit from a while ago:

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Tabouli

The nice thing about Al-Amar is that each table gets 2 types of complimentary breads together with olive oil and seasoning salts.

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Baby Bagels

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Pita breads

Normally one would order the mezze plate of assorted hummus, but why order them if one can whizz these dips easily at home? (Chuck a can of drained chickpeas and a drizzle a bit of olive oil, then blend in the blender).

Foods in Al-Amar tend to be on the sour side.   If you crave for something really sour, I recommend the Dolmades (rice stuffed in vine leaves and marinated in lemon juice and olive oil) or what they call Warak Enab in Lebanese for appetiser.  A really sour finger food which jolts one awake, this is a welcoming respite after all the sweet Malaysian fares eaten in KL.

The restaurant has a huge oven on display, so naturally one would ordered grilled dishes.

I ordered Lamb Kofta, which came with more bread, spices and onions – warranting no complaints from me. (for the adventurous, there are raw lamb meats too!)

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Lamb Kofta

The oven baked Snapper looked festive sitting on a bed of lettuce and surrounded by lemons, tomatoes and onions.  It was a delicious fish.  Tarator dressing (made from more lemon juice, yoghurt, oil and nuts) was paired with the fish if one wants more flavour.  In the midst of eating, we realised that the fish was not cooked in the middle so we had to send it back, which was a negative.

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Oven Baked Fish

We had a bottle of Lebanese red wine from Chateau Musar which I thought  was rather special, as this was my first time tasting vino from the ancient civilisation of Mesopotamia  (Interesting history read up here ).   It’s a young fruity wine, with a nose of rich red fruits, cherries and violets. The tannins left a long velvety touch hinting towards dark fruits at the end.

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Chateau Musar Jeaune Red

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Interior

The interior harkens to Aladdin’s caves with red furnishings and exotic ornaments which is rather dated, but still attracting Middle-Eastern clienteles.   The restaurants serve huge buffet spread during the weekends.  A perfect chance to sample all the offerings the restaurant has.  I definitely recommend Al-Amar to the vegetarians, raw foodists and those who wanted something savoury and tart, away from the unctuously sweet dishes.

Harrods Cafe, Suria KLCC, Kuala Lumpur

Date of Visit: July 19 2013

Getting a simple ala carte dinner during the Ramadan month is pretty hard to come by in most hotels. This is because Ramadan is time for the hoteliers to cash in on the all-you-can-eat-iftar-buffet. The iftar buffet is a lavish affair and very popular so advanced reservations are required. I gather that most companies are also using Ramadan as company dinners as well.

However, doesn’t this debase the religious purpose of fasting for spiritual purification into a simply indoctrinated practice of not eating during the day for fear of prosecution by the religious police turning into food-frenzy come sun-set? This is also not particularly healthy.

Moreover, I was unsettled by an article that a friend of mine sent me the other day. Non-Muslim students eating in the toilet? That is simply a no-no… Check out the link here for the complete story. In a seemingly peaceful multi-cultural country like Malaysia, one would expect harmony and tolerance but unfortunately tensions on the racial divides runs underneath.

Anyway, without digressing further, off to my Sundown Set-dinner at the Harrods Cafe in Suria KLCC. Among all the cafes in KLCC, I particularly like Harrods Cafe for the clean and bright ambience. There is a bit of a posh English expat touch to the interior from the white-washed timber panelling, tiled floors, cane chairs, quirky Harrods boater hats that the wait-staffs wear, down to the cutleries and china!

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Interior and server

Sundown Set Dinner @RM52 per person.

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Sundown Special Set Dinner

First to arrive were 2 types of juices – mango juice, orange juice and a mug of English Tea Teh Tarik. Apparently, this English Teh Tarik is only available in Malaysia! We were suprised that they all came at once. As usual, the drinks were overly sweet, however in the break fast context probably to give the much needed energy boost after a day of fasting, I presume. I like the ‘teh tarik’ (pulled tea) which has a frothy head, I particularly like the tannic vanillin tea taste.

A short wait later, our soup of the day, the pumpkin soup arrived with some toasted bread. The server very nicely cracked some black pepper over it.

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Top: Drinks
Bottom: Soup

Service was very slow that night, and I noticed the Muslims were all not eating. They were only drinking the 3 drinks and eating the dessert platter, which I found odd. Then at the stroke at 7:30pm, the in-house speaker piped in the evening prayers. From then on, the service caught up, and we got our mains.

My dining companions chose from the Western Delights, pictures below:

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Pan-fried Fillet Beef with Black Pepper Sauce

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Baked Perch Fillet with Butter Caper Sauce

I chose from the Local Flavours which came with biryani rice. My lukewarm perch fillet was accompanied by the tamarind vegetable curry, which was very ordinary. However, I like the dhal curry sauce in the small pot which has a strong nutmeg flavour in it.

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Baked Perch Fillet with Tamarind Curry

Ending our dinner, we have 2 courses of desserts! I don’t particularly like the local desserts. The melting chocolate mousse cake was a disappointment. The other 3 types of savoury-sweet local kuihs were an acquired taste.

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Left: Local desserts with dates
Right: Fruits

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Ramadan Decorations at Suria KLCC Mall

The Sundown Dinner was very ordinary, disappointing cafeteria-fare, however, since I am a regular at Harrod’s Cafe, here’s my recommendation:

The smallish Caesar Salad with anchovies and bruchetta.

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Caesar Salad

Burger with fried-egg, Malaysian-style

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Harrods Burger

Fish-fingers and Chips with tartare sauce and lemon

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Fish and Chips

Honest-to-goodness, old fashioned Strawberry Cheesecake which is very popular and tasted fantastic.

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Strawberry Cheesecake

Simple Fare, Stylish Environ @ AMCE Bar & Coffee, Troika KLCC, Kuala Lumpur

Date of Visit: July 2 2013

The KL property market had a soft-landing back in late 2000. I was not suprised when Malaysian property developers kicked off their sales launches in Hong Kong since there are many Malaysian expats living in Hong Kong. High-end properties in KL are very much cheaper compared to Hong Kong, and it was envisaged that most Malaysian expats would be looking to retire back home in Malaysia where the cost of living is lower. In a nutshell, that was how Troika came into my radar. I went to its launch at Mandarin Oriental to see the Norman Foster design, unfortunately the wasted spaces and dead corners did not excite. There was no mention of sky-dining at all.

Now what excited me about AMCE was its sharp interior from the same designer who did the clever interior for Melur & Thyme (my lunch experience here). Since my associates and I were in the vicinity with 2 hours to kill before our next appointment, we dropped in for a coffee and a quick bite.

Incidentally, in Greek, ‘Amce’ means ‘the best’. At the moment, AMCE is the best cafe in the prestigious KLCC condominium area, simply because it is the only cafe – unless one wants to trek across the KLCC Park to the Convention Center or to Suria KLCC on the other end.

What drew me to the design was its functionality in using natural lights, circulation and ease of assembly (and dismantling since it is in a residential block). Central to the design is the service booth which functions as reception, drinks and sometimes buffet display area. One’s experience begins from one’s entry through the heavy brass doors, being led by service through the double-volume atrium lined by light weight I-beam structures with over hanging pseudo-street style lamps which gave a feel of instant retro-industrial ‘oomph’.

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Reception

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An otherwise, basic fit-out highlighted by I-beams and overhanging lamps.

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Side-walk Cafe

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Service area

Mirrors are suspended on the ceiling affixed on steel girdles for added drama. Oxidised mirrors also lined the length of the wall. One would certainly enjoy a surreal experience with soft lights bouncing off the ceilings and wall under dim lightings. When dinner service comes around, the tinkling soft background music would perhaps make a romantic experience a well.

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Upper part of the split level bistro

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Private booths

There are little touches of details noted throughout the bistro. I especially liked the details in the light bulbs and custom-made tables with plumbing pipes for legs. The colour palette is muted with dusty pink banquette, grey steel, natural coloured timbers and white/ patterned tiles.

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The cleverness of the designer is further displayed at the end of the bistro, where one can find a Mondrian-esque decorative art on the brick wall using only the chasing of plumbing pipes.

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Plumbing Wall Art

Between participating in chit-chats with my associates and appreciating the bistro fit-outs, I had a cup of tea (Cherry Marzipan which smelt very good and something different to my usual order of Mint tea) whilst my associates enjoyed their hot coffees.

My quick bite was Japanese Scrambled Egg Salad with Miso Mayo (RM29) which sounded interesting but tasted very average. It was slightly overdone with rubbery texture. However, this is an easy DIY if I were to recreate at home.

Recipe for Le Chica’s Japonaise a la Scrambled Egg Salad
Pick up a pre-packed mixed salad (whichever that takes your fancy) from the supermarket
Scramble 2 eggs (my preference is to crack 2 eggs into the pan with a tablespoon of cream and give it a quick whirl)
Mix a tablespoon of mayo with a teaspoon of miso paste for dressing
Assemble

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AMCE’s Japanese Scrambled Egg Salad

Other interesting bites from the menu which I can attempt at home from looking at the ingredients listed on the menu are:
Mango Yoghurt Chilled Gazpacho (RM21)an easy-peasy blizz for my Vitamix using fresh mango, lemon, yoghurt, seasoned with white wine vinegar, decorated with a sprinkling of shallots and a touch of tomato salsa.
Strawberry Pomelo & Rocket Salad (RM21) which one of my associates had. My DIY at home would be a quick assembly of rocket salad, some slices of red radish, strawberries, pomelo, citrus segments with a touch of balsamic vinaigrette.

Service busied themselves with setting up for the lunch but still kept an eye on us in case we needed service.

Personally, a dining experience is never complete without a tour to the restrooms. There are 3 stalls of unisex toilet, each fitted with a timber door with vintagey opaque glass. Overall, it looked retro and perhaps a hand-pulled flush toilet would complete the vintage feel.

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Wash area

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Inside the stall

If you are residing nearby, no doubt you would have been there many times and might had even made AMCE one of your locals. For a visitor to the area, just drop in for a cuppa to soak the ambience.

Que Volveré @ La Boca Latino Bar, Pavilion Kuala Lumpur

Date of Visit: July 2 2013

With the bright colours and funky murals evoking Bohemian vibes, one would expect La Boca Latino Bar to be easy to find. In my case, it was not. I had walked past it countless times without knowing the existence of a bar tucked away near the thoroughfare, hidden under the escalator on Level 3 of The Connection at Pavilion. It was a mere coincidence that I was in the vicinity one day and was led by the loud music to a crowd gathering in front of the bar. Apparently this is a popular bar for live singing and dancing, in particular tango and samba nights. I made a mental note to visit the bar when it is quieter, which happened to be on this particular Tuesday night.

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The essence of the rough-and-tumble shanty barrio of Carminito’, in the La Boca dockside district of Buenos Aires are recaptured by the brightly coloured hand-painted murals on the wall.   Together with colourful flags,  balloons and chairs, they added an eclectic ambience together with  little touches of novelties such as window-shutters to frame the portraitures, wrought-iron balconies and spiral stairs to further enliven the space with loud music.   My only hang-up was that it was not air-conditioned and a smoking restaurant.

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Welcome! Giant mural depicting Tango dancers

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Bar featuring flags from latino countries

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Stage for Live Music and Performances

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2-D Murals

With a mixologist hailing all the way from Brazil, an extensive drinks menu showcasing his skill is a must and only proper.  Alas, me being me, I still ordered our usual tipple – a Caipirinha – nothing more perfect to end a hectic day than a zesty alcoholic kick with mouth-puckering fresh limes.

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The menu is another extensive list of Latino cuisine detailing foods from Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, Mexico and Peru (a reference to the colourful flags at the bar).   It was hard to pick, but we settled for the ‘Argentinian theme’.  We were looking forward to sample Argentinian rotisserie steak (which comes in skewer) but advised by the server that it will be a slab of steak instead.

Striploin (RM68) was cooked medium-rare as requested.  Charred on the outside, still juicy with a bit of red on the inside.  Served ‘gaucho-style’ with chimichurri sauce, and a side of   mixed green salad and chips.  It would be wonderful if the cut originates from Argentina, but then again happy with the Aussie alternative.

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Pizza Rellena (RM30) is Argentinian folded pizza, similar to the Italian calzone.  I had a mild shock when it arrived, for it was a huge thing!   Relief came after cutting it open to find  that it was puffed up by  hot steam.  I  was delighted  with the generous stuffing of ham, salami, mozzarella, basil and olives.  A tomato sauce came with it, but did nothing to enhance the already delish pie/pizza.

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Overly-stuffed, we did not opt for dessert although we were looking forward for the Churros when we first sat down.  This and also the very rowdy group of red-neck expats just seated at our next table made for quick exit.

All-in, service was affable and smooth (quick) and I believe we met the proprietor as well.  Judging from his friendliness and his overly familiar use of the word ‘tapow, tapow‘ (take away), I am sure he uses it often on his customers for the huge serves he serves in his bar.

Que volveré !  I will be back for Peruvian next, for Creviche and Pisco Sour.

Grabin’ A Grub @ Morganfield’s, Pavilion Kuala Lumpur

Date of Visit: July 1 2013

The first 3 days of July sees me jetting into KL again. The views of KL city was pretty from the plane with the low-laying layer of opaque haze. However, before I could further romanticise the views, the door to the plane opened allowing the acrid smell of smoke to fill the cabin and my eyes started to water. Fantastic! I’ve left the Borneo jungles and now fronting the developing world problem. HAZE! *cough* *cough*

With my city digs at The Pavilion, I have to front yet another developing world problem, that is, where to eat? I am fast running out of ideas. Spasso (my review here)  came to mind, but wishing to reduce my carbohydrate intake due to my lack of exercise and thus guilt for inactivities for the last couple of weeks (blame haze and heat), I reached for one of the dozen food apps I had installed on my mobile for a recommendation from strangers.  Speaking of which, I am also venturing into the world of food apps development. To be more specific, I am investing into a food app start-up, a real physical company which I am very excited about.

Righto, I am 0.9km away from Morganfield’s and photos of the ribs and desserts looked delish…

So here we are at 6:30pm, myself and one other arrived in front of service discussing of whether we should go in.

The diner is basic and grubby, smelling of grease, smoke and stale ciggies. Judging from the huge bar area, one could certainly discern that alcoholic beverages is huge selling point here (like the rest of the joints clustering at the Connection Bridge in Pavilion). To help with our decision the helpful service at the front showed us the menu. We did a quick glance and went in for a punt.

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Walking towards our table, we passed by a couple of tourists wearing bibs (?!) eating a humongous platter of ribs, chicken, chips and corn bread served on a metal tray. This is a definite ode to obesity!

The disposable placemats on the tables has recommendation options for the sharing plates, which are way too big for the 2 of us.

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My dining companion ordered the Smokin’ Cheese Burger.  It was a huge double-patty cheese burger stabbed with a steak knife for added drama, but  did not ‘wow’.  Chips were edible but erred to the salty side, understandable since the diner has to up-sell drinks. It was gobbled up simply for the sake of eating.

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My Smokin’ Duck Salad has a dodgy Peking Duck’s influence – lettuce, cucumbers, spring onions, capsicums and strips of defrosted Peking duck sprinkled with sesame seeds.  It came with sesame soy sauce on the side.  No complaints, the vegs filled me up and it was a long time I had eaten the century egg.

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The service rings of Malaysian hospitality – all smiles, friendly and professional.  The decor was unfortunately a confused eclectic assemble of a pseudo-American diner.   Pictures hanging on brick walls, and a juke box at a corner.  There was also a  TV  showing Mr Bean which kept the little girl from our next table entertained.

Dessert was a Bread Pudding  which came with a stingy serve of  ‘special’ whiskey sauce.  It radiates home-made with store-bought Nestle vanilla ice-cream.  Satisfied our sweet-tooth nonetheless!

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We did not linger long at the diner after dessert. On our way out, I noticed the couple still struggling to finish The Carnivore.

In all fairness, Morganfield’s is a ribs joint.   Here I am, using my food app for recommendation from strangers, knowing full well that each person has different taste buds and what I ate was not rated nor recommended by these strangers, so I was at my own peril.  It was nevertheless pretty interesting.

Will I be back? Never say never, perhaps I might try the ribs one day if I can justify the carbs.

A Bowl of Salad and Chippies Ahoy! @ Ben’s, Pavilion Kuala Lumpur

Date of Visit: June 10 2013

Following a hearty lunch at Tonkatsu earlier on (my review here), I was still feeling rather full. But it’s dinner time and rather than raiding the fridge in the middle of the night by skipping my dinner, I opted for a lighter salad fare. However, finding a place that serves proper salads in KL is hard – I have tried Pavilion’s TGI Friday where they offer an uninteresting single varietal salad of iceberg lettuces, sweet corns and cherry tomatoes heavily drenched in dressing which  defeats the purpose of a ‘light fare’.

Meanwhile, I have walked passed Ben’s countless times and perused its overly lengthy board menu placed at the entrance. The restaurant aims to please all its diners by offering an array of choices, unfortunately, this was a put-off for the indecisives. But because I remembered that they have salads on offer and since I had already decided on what I am going to order – a salad – hence the mission of ordering should be easy.

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So, here we are, Mom, Bro and I, ending up at Ben’s to be quickly ushered into the restaurant.   I am not sure about the replica of  a living room at the front.  Perhaps, the big blue sofa is for the take-away patrons to rest their tired derrières while waiting for their orders.  A huge lamp for reading the Hello! magazines were very thoughtfully provided.   Nonetheless, the standout is the colour of the bright yellow feature wall which I thought absolutely stunning (I love bright colours).

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The restaurant itself is a long space.  A banquette with throw cushions was set against one wall, making excellent spatial economics for when the restaurant has to accomodate for a large group.  The tables need only be joined together and some chairs borrowed.  The space spills out to an outdoor dining area on the balcony overlooking the Bukit Bintang strip which would be perfect for an idle afternoon tea or to partake in the vibrancy when BB comes alive at night.

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Cleverness in details is one thing that I noted about Ben’s.  Everything from the napkins, to the box of card games for ideas to kick off conversations on the table right down to the details of the waist-coat-aprons on the wait-staffs.

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Despite my simple plan of ordering a salad, the extensive menu of 10 different salads on offer still required a decision from me.  Finally, I went straight for the vegetarian option. Ben’s House Salad ($15.90) came with all my favourite goodies – endame and avocado. I have asked to have the dressing on the side since nothing can be more annoying than a salad drowned in dressing.  I was taken in by the freshness of the roasted pistachios, almonds, walnuts, sun-flower seeds, flaxseeds et al, which were noted as ‘7 seeds’ on the menu.   So stuffed to the brim with vegies, I am rest assured that I would not be raiding the fridge when night falls.

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For my Mom and Bro, the process of eliminating Sandwiches, Pies, Pastas, Asians and Soups narrowed down to the Traditional options for them.  My Mom opted for  the Fish and Chips ($29.90) .  This came with a small side of coleslaw. With such an array of choices to choose from, it would not come a suprise if the fish fingers and chips were from the  frozen prepackaged supermarket origin rather than from the markets.   Nevertheless, how can one resist the seduction of a Machiavellian piece of crispy fried  temptation?  As in trance, I reached out for a piece, then another, and another, and soon half the chips were in my stomach! Oh dear!

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My brother’s normal dinner at home is always a piece of steak.  His Steak Frites ($52.90) was a pretty ordinary chargrilled strip loin with black peper sauce.  Together, the chips and  plateful of green beans ensured that he is taking in his recommended vegetables for the day.

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Although we did not have dessert, the lovey-dovey-gooey  looks exchanged by the couples at the next table while they tucked in their luscious slice of chocolate brownie cake said it all.   With my induction done, I shall be back for more salads and dessert the next time!

A Crunchy Piece of Piggy Heaven @ Tonkatsu, Pavilion Kuala Lumpur

Date of Visit:  June 10 2013

Tonkatsu – a piece of crunchy deep-fried pork heaven – is an ubiquitous cafeteria staple in Japan.

But, did you know that tonkatsu has European roots?  Katsu is the Japanese pronunciation of ‘cutlets’ (pronounced ka-tsu-reh-toh in Japanese), whereas Ton means ‘pork’ in Japanese, thus tonkatsu, thus pork cutlets.   As a very amateur cook, the Chica is pleased to explain that the underlying difference between the European’s pork cutlets and Japanese tonkatsu lies in that the Western pork cutlets being coated with bread crumbs then pan-fried with butter, whereas the Japanese Katsu is deep fried in vegetable oil rendering it crunchier while maintaining the juice and tenderness of the meat inside.

Never mind…

As you probably notice, there are also many restaurants specialising in tonkatsu around.  In Pavilion Mall, there is Tonkatsu by Wa Kitchen, located on Level 6.

I should state that I am very apprehensive to anything deep-fried especially for calorie-sake and the type of oils used in the frying.  Having been to China, I have heard too many horror stories about re-using dirty recycled oil.  Nevertheless, I was prompted to try since there is not many eating establishments on Level 6 that I have not eaten, besides, I wanted to tick-off  Tonkatsu by Wa Kitchen on my list.

Following a quick welcome by the staff at the door, we were seated promptly.  I am thrilled to see Japanese bankers (they were wearing their tags) having their lunch as their presence vouch the authenticity of this tonkatsu place.  On the table was a tray of condiments – vinegar, dark soy and a bottle of sesame seeds.  Seeing that a grinding bowl and wooden pestle is provided, I took it as a DIY exercise to grind my own sesame dressing.

Should I point out that one should grind the dry sesame seeds before adding in the liquids?  A major faux pas on my side, see the picture below.

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My tray of Katsu Soba arrived shortly after.  On the tray was  a small dish of Japanese chilli flakes for me to sprinkle on my soba and my crispy pork loin katsu resting on a rack (I am not sure whether other orders come with their katsu on the racks, but I had asked for my katsu to be separated from the noodles since I don’t like my katsu to be soggy).   In my bowl of steaming soba are some seaweeds, bamboo shoots and half an egg.  The soba was cooked to my liking – al dente, however, perhaps this is a Malaysian-thing, the soup was simply too sweet for me to drink.

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Needless to say, it was wonderfully satisfying to sink my teeth into a crispy golden piece of juicy katsu and hearing myself chomping away.  With limited stomach space, I had to guiltily leave 2 pieces of the katsu heaven behind, thus hoping I am pursuing the greater karmic goodness through feeding those creatures less fortunate in the food chain

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The other set that my dining companion ordered was the very simply called Set 1, which has pork-cutlet tonkatsu served with shredded cabbage, rice, mixed egg plant and miso soup.  Unbeknownst to us until later, the shredded cabbage is refillable gratis

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Minced pork with egg plant topped with scallions for a bit of colour.  A very flavoursome side dish

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The accompanying katsu for the rice set is a piece of choice pork-cutlet with a different texture to my pork-loin being a different cut of meat.

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A hearty meal tucked in deserved a little rest before heading back to our erstwhile duties.  While we would be happy to spend more time in the pleasant environment, time beckoned for us to leave and around RM35 lighter each (including drinks).

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